FAQs

I have PSORAISIS - Which products are recommended?

We have had so many customers ask this question, and although everybody’s skin is different,  a lot of them write back to tell us how effective our NHS skincare products was for them and relieves and soothes their itchy skin almost instantaneously.  All our products are suitable for all ages including babies.

The British Association of Dermatologists offers three patient information leaflets on psoriasis giving more detailed information about the condition.   Patients with psoriasis are usually treated with’topical’ creams and ointments, which are applied to the skin.  A topical treatment is something that is applied directly to the skin or body surface. The commonest examples are lotions, creams, ointments, gels and shampoos. Most people with mild psoriasis are able to manage their skin complaint with a topical treatment.

Which products are recommended?

Our products were developed scientifically to supply key essential fatty acids to the skin in the form of Sunflower Oil (a natural emollient),  keeping it soft and hydrated resulting in the elimination of uncomfortable dry itchy skin.  Feedback from psoriasis sufferers have told us how effective our natural My Trusty Sunflower Body Butter is on their dry plaques, saying that this product is richer, thicker, easy to apply, does not leave greasy marks on clothes and relieves the itchy or tight skin, symptoms.  It is particularly helpful at night.  They have also discovered that our Sunflower Face & Body Oil is excellent too as it has the highest content of sunflower oil (10%), and helps relieve an itchy scalp, face, behind the ears or some areas that are very scaly where less rubbing in would be more appropriate.  Both are found to be really beneficial for nails and feet.  Our Sunflower Body Lotion and Hand Creams come as Fragrance Free or with a soothing natural essential oil of Lavender fragrance.  These are both water-based creams, that are easily absorbed, light and non-greasy and are effective as a daily, all-over-body, moisturiser that should be applied as often as possible to keep the skin from drying out.

Topical treatments for psoriasis

Treatment for moderate or severe psoriasis

What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease affecting 2% of the population. It occurs equally in men and women, can appear at any age, and tends to come and go unpredictably. It is not infectious, therefore you cannot catch psoriasis from someone else. It does not scar the skin although sometimes it can cause a temporary increase or reduction in skin pigmentation. Although psoriasis is a long-term condition there are many effective treatments available to keep it under good control.

Psoriasis can affect the nails and the joints as well as the skin. About half of people with psoriasis have psoriasis affecting the nails. For people with moderate to severe psoriasis about one in three will develop psoriatic arthritis at some time. Psoriatic arthritis produces swelling and stiffness in the joints or stiffness in the lower back and should be managed by a rheumatologist who works closely with your dermatologist and/or your GP.

Psoriasis, particularly moderate to severe psoriasis, is associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression. Moderate to severe psoriasis increases the risk of heart disease and stroke and treatment of psoriasis may reduce this risk. Psoriasis can also be associated with an increased risk of harmful use of alcohol and with diabetes and obesity.

Can psoriasis be cured?

Unfortunately there is no cure for psoriasis yet. However, in most cases the condition can be improved, and sometimes cleared, by regular use of treatment. Psoriasis usually comes back (relapses) if treatment is stopped. There is no evidence that any treatment alters the future severity of psoriasis. Delaying treatment or using treatment early does not affect the future outcome (prognosis) of psoriasis.

What are the main topical treatments used for psoriasis?

The aims of topical psoriasis treatment are to remove excess scaly skin and calm the underlying inflammation. This will improve the appearance and help the skin feel more comfortable and less itchy. Different treatments are often used at different body sites and for some areas such as the scalp, a combination of treatments are needed to get the best results. Treatments for psoriasis include the following:

  • Emollients (moisturisers) work by moisturising dry skin, reducing scaling and relieving itching. They soften cracked areas and help other topical treatment get through the skin and work more effectively. They can also be used instead of soap for washing and cleansing washing.  It is usually advised that they are applied about 30 minutes before other psoriasis treatments such as steroids (see below). Very mild psoriasis may settle with emollients alone.  Emollients can be applied as often as needed until the skin is no longer dry.
  • For further reading on psoriasis, click on the following link to the British Association of Dermatology.

 

I have ECZEMA (Atopic Eczema) - Which products are recommended?

We have had so many customers ask this question, and although everybody’s skin is different,  a lot of them write back to tell us how effective our NHS skincare products was for them and relieves and soothes their itchy skin almost instantaneously.  All our products are suitable for all ages including babies upwards of 8 weeks old.

 Click here to read more.  Our fragrance free My Trusty Sunflower moisturiser, suitable for sensitive skin, comes in two sizes – 100ml tube or 250ml pump.

Natural Sunflower Seed Oil is the basis of all our skincare range.  Sunflower seed oil is a gentle emollient and is very effective in stimulating the skin’s natural healing ability. It is high in linoleic acid and has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. It is non-sensitising, is non-greasy and absorbs easily and quickly into the skin, and will not block the block the pores, which can cause blackheads or pimplesIt is the safest of all the vegetable oils safe for moisturizing the skin. 

Essential oils for dry itchy skin are a promising new treatment method, in addition to laser and other complex skin rejuvenation options.

Our Sunflower Face & Body oil – 50ml has the highest content of Sunflower oil across all our product (10%), and is infused with essential oils of neroli, bergamot and rose, making it a really lovely moisturiser to apply to the face and body.  It is very safe, and suitable for all ages including babies over the age of 8 weeks.

The unique formulas of ALL our products are based around natural sunflower oil, because of the benefits linoleic acid has on our skin.  Our other products are very effective too.  The Sunflower Body Lotion or Hand creams have 5% sunflower oil in them.  The Sunflower Body Butter, is much thicker/richer, and has a 6.5% sunflower oil content.  

Has The Formula Changed At All?

YES, in February 2017.  But don’t worry – it’s better!

We listened to our customers and retailers which led us to improve the preservative within our sunflower formula, and make our packaging clearer.  If you have any known allergies, please do check the product ingredients list carefully.

So what’s changed?

  • The NEW and improved Sunflower Cream formula is now without SLS (sodium laurel sulphate) – the emulsifier that enables the sunflower oil to mix with the water.  Although vegetable derived, this emulsifier has received unfavourable press in past years , so we have replaced it with Sodium Stearoyl Glutamate and Ceteryl Glucoside, which are much nicer and seen as a more natural alternative.
  • The 250ml bottles of Sunflower Cream have been renamed as Sunflower Body Lotion …. because that’s exactly where is goes – on the Body, Face or Hands. And, our fresh sunflower packaging would look lovely in your bathroom, or even by the sink!
  • The 100ml tubes of Sunflower Cream have also been re-named because they are just a perfect ‘handy’ size for busy people on the go. Our hand creams and body lotions are the same formulas – just different sizes, so you can keep your skin moisturised, wherever you are.
  • We have also replaced the existing preservative, with Potassium Sorbate, and Benzyl Alcohol – both of which are fully acceptable to the Natural & Organic Standards.

And finally ….

  • All products have an easy to understand colour banding to help recognise them, with or without fragrances.
  • Sunflower Yellow – is fragrance free.
  • Purple – is lavender fragrance
  • Orange – is neroli, bergamot and orange fragrance
  • Pink- is neroli, bergamot and rosemary fragrance

My Trusty complies with the new cosmetic regulation EC-1223/2009 ‘recast’ became active on 1 January 2012 and was fully in place by 11 July 2013.

What makes My Trusty Skincare so special?

  • It’s developed by NHS skincare specialists
  • Gentle, water-based sunflower formula
  • All profits go back to support NHS patient care
  • It’s proven to help reduce the appearance of scars/stretch marks
  • Award winning skincare range
  • 0% parabens/ lanolin / SLS (Sodium Laurel Sulphate)
  • Dermatologically tested
  • Fragrance free option within the range
  • Clinically proven / paediatrician approved
  • Against animal testing
  • An effective 24hr moisturiser

Who can use My Trusty Skincare?

My Trusty is safe to use on all ages including babies upwards of 8-weeks old. This includes people who may be prone to eczema, psoriasis or other similar dry skin symptoms.

Where can I use My Trusty Skincare?

My Trusty moisturisers can be used on the hands, face and body as part of a daily skincare routine to keep skin nourished, soft and supple, and are suitable for all skin types.

How do I use My Trusty Skincare?

Apply liberally onto clean skin 2-3 times per day. Gently moisturise and massage the area in circular movements. Unsuitable for use on broken skin. For external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes.

Are My Trusty products tested on animals?

No. We, (and our manufacturers), are fully compliant with the following legislation. “The use of animals to test cosmetics products or their ingredients is banned in the UK and all other member states of the European Union. Since March 2013, it has also been illegal to sell cosmetics products within the EU which have been, or which contain ingredients, newly tested on animals.”

Click here for more information from RSPCA.

I have ROSACEA - Which products are recommended?

We have had so many customers ask this question, and although everybody’s skin is different,  a lot of them write back to tell us how effective our Face & Body oil was for them.

Sunflower Seed Oil

Sunflower seed oil is very effective in stimulating the skin’s natural healing ability. It is high in linoleic acid and has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. It is non-sensitising, is non-greasy and absorbs easily and quickly into the skin, and will not block the block the pores, which can cause blackheads or pimples.  It is the safest of all the vegetable oils safe for moisturizing the skin.  Essential oils for rosacea are a promising new treatment method, in addition to laser and other complex skin rejuvenation options.

Our Sunflower Face & Body oil – 50ml has the highest content of Sunflower oil across all our product (10%), and is infused with essential oils of neroli, bergamot and rose, making it a really lovely moisturiser to apply to the face and body.  It is very safe, and suitable for all ages including babies over the age of 8 weeks.

The unique formulas of ALL our products are based around natural sunflower oil, because of the benefits linoleic acid has on our skin.  Our other products are very effective too.  The Sunflower Body Lotion or Hand creams have 5% sunflower oil in them.  The Sunflower Body Butter, is much thicker/richer, and has a 6.5% sunflower oil content.  https://mytrustyskincare.co.uk/product/face-body-oil-with-neroli-bergamot-rosemary-50ml/

Is My Trusty skincare suitable for vegetarians and vegans?

Yes. Our products do not include any animal derivatives, so are therefore suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

What are My Trusty product made of?

Sunflower Body Lotion & Hand Cream – Fragrance Free 

Aqua (Water), Cetearyl Alcohol (vegetable wax), Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Benzyl Alcohol, Sodium Stearoyl Glutamate (emulsifier), Cetearyl Glucoside (emulsifier), Potassium Sorbate, Citric Acid, Sodium Phytate, Dehydroacetic Acid (preservative), Tocopherol (anti-oxidant – Vitamin E), Cetyl Alcohol (vegetable wax), Stearyl Alcohol (conditioning agent)

Sunflower Body Lotion & Hand Cream – with Lavender essential oils

Aqua (Water), Cetearyl Alcohol (vegetable wax), Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Benzyl Alcohol (preservative), Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Sodium Stearoyl Glutamate (emulsifier), Cetearyl Glucoside (emulsifier), Citric Acid (PH adjuster), Potassium Sorbate (preservative), Sodium Phytate (stabiliser), Linalool, Dehydroacetic Acid (preservative), Tocopherol (anti-oxidant), Cetyl Alcohol (vegetable wax), Stearyl Alcohol (conditioning agent), Limonene, Geraniol

Sunflower Face & Body Oil – with neroli, bergamot & rosemary essential oils

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil, Coco-Caprylate, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Coconut Alkanes, Coco-Caprylate/Caprate, Rosa Canina Fruit Oil, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Flower Oil, Limonene, Linalool, Tocopherol, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Oil, Farnesol, Geraniol, Citral

Sunflower Body Butter – with bergamot, neroli & orange essential oils

Aqua (Water), Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Glycerin, Coco-Caprylate, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-100 Stearate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Wax, Dimethicone, Rosa Canina Fruit Oil, Phenoxyethanol, Xanthan Gum, Limonene, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Flower Oil, Ethylhexylglycerin, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Linalool, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil, Disodium EDTA, Farnesol, Sodium Hydroxide, Geraniol, Tocopherol, Citric Acid

What is Card Verification Code (CVC)?

The Card Verification Code, or CVC*, is an extra code printed on your debit or credit card. With most cards (Visa, MasterCard, bank cards, etc.) it is the final three digits of the number printed on the signature strip on the reverse of your card.   What is CVC – Card Verification Code. Read more…

My Trusty Body Lotion - Pump Queries

Safety Clip:Ensure you have removed the clear plastic safety clip from the neck of the pump before use.  Handy Tip:  rather than throw away, re-sue the safety clip when travelling to prevent any leakage.

Dispensing Difficulties?  Due to the viscosity of the lotion, we recommend  that our users tap the base of the bottle onto a hard surface to shake the remaining contents to the base.  This will enable the contents to continue to be dispensed.

I have PALMOPLANTAR PUSTULOSIS - Which moisturiser is recommended?

Chronic dry itchy skin is very uncomfortable, painful and often embarrassing for people.  Moisturisers should be applied several times a day to prevent dryness and itching of the skin and to act as a barrier. The greasiest moisturisers, which can often be referred to as an emollient due to the oil content, are the most effective.  Our NHS ownedMy Trusty Sunflower Body Butter is the richest and thickest moisturiser of our range and feedback from our customers has demonstrated this to be a excellent moisturiser to combat seriously dry itchy skin – such as psoriasis.

One such condition we often get asked about is palmoplantar pustulosis.

What is palmoplantar pustulosis?
The British Association of Dermatology (B.A.D) define Palmoplantar pustulosis as a long term (chronic) condition which affects the skin of the palms and soles. It can sometimes occur with the skin condition psoriasis.   They have provided the following information to help better understand the condition.

What is palmoplantar pustulosis?
Palmoplantar pustulosis is a long term (chronic) condition which affects the skin of the palms and soles. It can sometimes occur with the skin condition psoriasis.

What causes palmoplantar pustulosis?
The cause of palmoplantar pustulosis is not understood. It is an auto-immune disease, meaning that the immune defences of the body work against itself. It is much more frequent in women, and in current or ex-smokers.  There is some debate whether palmoplantar pustulosis is a form of psoriasis or a disease in its own right. Psoriasis on other parts of the body is found in 10-20% of patients, and some people with palmoplantar pustulosis have family members with psoriasis. Confusingly, though, the psoriasis treatments TNFalpha antagonists are known to occasionally trigger palmoplantar pustulosis.  However, many other treatments for psoriasis do improve palmoplantar pustulosis.  Some patients experience a flare up of palmoplantar pustulosis following
infections with streptococcal bacteria.

Who gets palmoplantar pustulosis?
Anybody can get palmoplantar pustulosis, but it is more common in women than in men and is rare in children. Those with family members who have palmoplantar pustulosis or psoriasis are more likely to be affected. It may also occur with other medical conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, thyroid disorders or coeliac disease.

Is palmoplantar pustulosis hereditary?
Palmoplantar pustulosis can run in families, but most patients have no other affected family members.

What are the symptoms of palmoplantar pustulosis?
The skin of the palms and/or soles can be very itchy and painful, particularly if there are deep fissures (cracks in the skin). The condition is often persistent but the symptoms can vary, becoming better and worse over time, often with no obvious cause.

What does palmoplantar pustulosis look like?
In palmoplantar pustulosis there is inflammation of the skin of the palms and soles, often symmetrically but sometimes only on one side. In flare-ups the skin is red, with small yellow pus spots (pustules) or red-brown blisters within the red patches. The blisters and pustules then dry up to become scaly. In the more persistent stage the skin can be dry and thickened, with fissures (cracks) in the skin. There is a sharp margin between normal and affected skin.

How will palmoplantar pustulosis be diagnosed?
In most cases, the diagnosis is made by your doctor simply looking at your skin.  As a fungal infection can look very similar, it can be helpful for your doctor to take a painless skin scrape to check for this. A painless swab may be taken to rule out a bacterial infection. Sometimes, a small biopsy may be needed to confirm the diagnosis. This requires a local anaesthetic injection into an affected area and the removal of a small piece of skin to look at under the microscope. This is followed by stitches to close the wound. The procedure is carried out by the dermatologist under local anaesthetic, while you are awake.

Is palmoplantar pustulosis serious?
Although the condition is not cancerous or contagious, the inflammation of the palms and soles can severely affect one’s quality of life. It can be painful and itchy and may affect sleep and work.

Can palmoplantar pustulosis be cured?
No. Like many skin conditions, palmoplantar pustulosis cannot be cured. There are, however, several treatment options which can improve it significantly.  Basic principles of good skin care can help to reduce the frequency and severity of flares (see below).

What is the treatment for palmoplantar pustulosis?
There are several different treatment options ranging from creams to UV light (phototherapy) treatment to tablets, and you and your doctor will need to decide
together which treatment is right for you. This may change over time, as the condition can be longstanding.

Creams and Ointments:
• Moisturisers should be applied several times a day to prevent dryness and itching of the skin and to act as a barrier. These can be prescribed or bought over the counter. The greasiest ointments are the most effective – such as our NHS owned, My Trusty Sunflower Body Butter.

  • Steroid creams and ointments reduce inflammation in the skin. They are stronger and more effective when applied under occlusion (under a cover), for example under a waterproof dressing, vinyl gloves or cling film. Unfortunately the skin can get used to steroids, so that they lose benefit if applied continuously. The potential side effect of skin thinning rarely occurs when steroid creams or ointments are used on the thick skin of the palms and soles. Steroid impregnated tapes can be very helpful for the cracks (fissures).
  • Tar ointments have been used for many decades to reduce inflammation in the skin. The smell and yellow-brown colour of these greasy ointments limit their use but some patients find them very helpful. They can be used in combined preparations with steroid ointments and salicylic acid.

Light treatment:

  • PUVA and re-PUVA are treatments with ultraviolet light A (UVA). The course of either treatment can take at least 10 weeks with twice weekly treatments at the dermatology department. The ‘P’ refers to a psoralen, a treatment used before each light exposure to increase the skin’s sensitivity to the UVA light. The psoralen is taken as tablets or by mouth, or applied to the hands and feet. In re-PUVA, daily retinoid (acitretin) tablets are taken to improve the benefit of the light and shorten the course of treatment.Tablets: More information on these treatments is available on the individual patient information leaflets listed under the individual drug names.
  • Acitretin is a tablet related to Vitamin A, and is one of a group of drugs called retinoids. This can be very effective but is not usually recommended in women of child bearing age as pregnancy must be avoided for 2 years after taking it. A newer retinoid called alitretinoin has also been used with some success, and this can be used in women of reproductive age as long as contraception with the oral contraceptive pill or an intrauterine contraceptive device is used, as well as barrier methods. These precautions are necessary as retinoids cause very serious abnormalities in unborn babies if taken during pregnancy.
  • Methotrexate and ciclosporin both reduce the immune response of the body. Methotrexate cannot be taken by men or women trying for a baby.
  • Other treatments may also be tried, depending on individual circumstances and need. Your doctor will discuss your options with you.

Self Care (What can I do?)
• If you are a smoker, you should try to stop. Unfortunately the benefit for the skin of stopping smoking may not be immediately obvious, but your general health will also benefit. There is help available in the NHS for this.

  • Soap, bubble bath or shower gel should be replaced by a moisturising cream or ointment for washing the affected areas.  A moisturiser should be applied several times a day to reduce inflammation and dryness.
  • Vinyl gloves should be worn for wet work and protective gloves for exposure to chemicals including household cleaning chemicals.  Appropriate gloves for any gardening or manual labour will reduce aggravating friction.
  • If possible, sore hands and feet should be rested by reduction of physical or chemical triggers. Socks and shoes made from cotton, rather than man-made fibres are better tolerated by inflamed skin. Wool, however, should be avoided as it can be irritant.
  • The benefit of special silk gloves or socks to help inflamed skin is debated, but such garments may be tried. Cotton gloves and socks can also be used at night over ointments to help reduce mess.
  • Thickened skin will crack (fissure) more easily. The skin thickness can be reduced by the application of salicylic acid or urea creams (heel balm) and then gently paring the skin down with a pumice stone or emery board. A podiatrist can offer advice and treatment with foot care.

Where can I get more information about palmoplantar pustulosis?
http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Palmoplantar-Pustulosis-(PPP).htm
http://www.dermnetnz.org/scaly/palmoplantar-pustulosis.html

For details of source materials used please contact the Clinical Standards Unit (clinicalstandards@bad.org.uk).  This information aims to provide accurate information about the subject and is a consensus of the views held by representatives of the British Association of Dermatologists: individual patient circumstances may differ, which might alter both the advice and course of therapy given to you by your doctor.